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Speakers

Jacqueline Allan
Marcel Annegarn
Tetsuya Asai

Koichi Awazu

Dirk Beernaert
Bharat Bhushan
Tof Carim
Robert J. Celotta
Hondga Chen
Ray Chen
Toyohiro Chikyow
Rathindra (Babu) DasGupta
Gilbert Declerck
Joe Dehmer
Makoto Fujimaki
Kosmas Galatsis
Paolo Gargini
James P. Gavigan
Charles (Chuck) L. Geraci

Barbara Goldstein
Lori Henderson
Toshiro Hiramoto
Michael Hochberg
Debra Kaiser
Shin'ichiro Kimura
Harriet Kung
Hubert Lakner
Mitch Lasat
Subhas Malghan
Michael Meador
David Miller
Mitsuyoshi Mori
Takao Mori
Naofumi Moriya
Anil K. Patri
Peter Peumans
Curt Richter
Mihail C. Roco

Ruud E.I. Schropp
David Seiler
Lewis Sloter
Junichi Sone
Adam Stieg
Thomas N. Theis
Mark Tuominen
Gernot Pomrenke
Fred van Roosmalen
Sergio O. Valenzuela
Maud Vinet
M. Juergen Wolf
Jun Ye
Charles Ying
Naoki Yokoyama



Jacqueline E M Allan, Head of Bio and Nanotech, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, Science and Technology Policy Division


Title: OECD Activities related to Nanotechnology
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

Since its inception in 2007, the OECD Working Party on Nanotechnology (WPN) has focused on the responsible development of nanotechnology and the support of government policy to achieve this.  It has examined the impact of nanotechnology on companies; risk governance and regulatory frameworks; international collaboration; skills and education; and commercialisation of research. The WPN has put significant effort into assisting policy makers and implementers to engage with stakeholders, most notably with its regularly updated guidance document on public engagement.

Its work complements that of the OECD Working Party on Manufactured Nanomaterials which focuses on environmental health and safety and standardised testing of materials. The two groups have long operated in partnership on specific activities of mutual interest such as a conference on The Potential Environmental Benefits of Nanotechnologyand a project on nanotechnology in tyres.

Also an important theme for governments is the measurement of nanotechnology and its impacts. The WPN published its 2009 review of Statistics and Indicators for Nanotechnology, an update of which will be published in 2014. It has also sought to address the issue of impact assessment and value for money and, in 2012, with the US NNI held an international symposium on Assessing the Economic Impact of Nanotechnology.

This presentation will provide an overview of key policy issues and work to date at the OECD.

Jacqueline Allan

Marcel Annegarn, General Director, AENEAS


Contact information:Marcel.Annegarn@aeneas-office.eu
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

Marcel Annegarn

Tetsuya Asai, Graduate School of Information Science Technology, Hokkaido University


Title: Trends in Neuromorphic Engineering towards Nanoelectronic Brain Machines
Contact information: asai@ist.hokudai.ac.jp
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

In this talk, I will summarize recent trends in neuromorphic engineering towards revealing possible opportunities for emerging research devices capable for noise- and fault- tolerant information processing particularly with regard to massive parallel spatial problems that digital processors are rather weak in. Noise and fluctuations are indeed considered obstacles in the operation of both analog and digital computing systems, and most strategies to deal with them focus on suppression. Neural systems, on the other hand, tend to employ strategies in which the properties of noise are exploited to improve the efficiency of operations. This concept may be especially useful in the design computing systems with noise-sensitive devices (e.g., extremely low-power devices like single-electron, molecular, subthreshold analog CMOS devices, etc.). This talk gives an overview of neuromorphic noise-driven information processing and their possible applications in electronics.

Tetsuya Asai

Koichi Awazu, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology


Title: Development of Palmtop Sensor for Rapid Diagnosis
Contact information: k.awazu@aist.go.jp
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

We developed a highly sensitive and palmtop sensor based on optical waveguide mode. Biosensing interface on the silica surface of the sensor chip was developed in order to suppress nonspecific adsorption. The first topic is that the discrimination of the H3N2 and H5N1 strains of influenza viruses has been clearly achieved with the waveguide-mode sensor. We found that glycan-based detection using the waveguide sensor system analysis was very useful to distinguish between H3N2 and H5N1 viruses. Sensitivity comparison among the waveguide-mode sensor, immuno-chromatography, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been performed. The highest sensitivity for H1N1 and H3N2 viruses was found in ELISA and the waveguide-mode sensor. The second topic is blood tests with the sensor. A microfluidic system was developed for blood separation. Blood tests for ABO type and Rh statue were performed with the sensor.

Koichi Awazu

Dirk Beernaert, Adviser for Interdisciplinary and Integrating Activities, European Commission


Title: Regional update on Science and Technology in Europe targeting Key Enabling Technologies
Contact information: Dirk.Beernaert@ec.europa.eu
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

The year 2013 has seen a shift from the previous European Framework Programmes for Research towards the new Horizon 2020 programme. The 7 year 77 B€ Programme will guide the R&D&I activities at European level from 2014 to 2020 and combines education, research and innovation in one single programme. The presentation will outline this initiative with special emphasis on Key Enabling Technologies (micro & nano-electronics, photonics, advanced materials, biotechnology, nanotechnology and advanced manufacturing) and will put this program in a wider industrial policy context.  A roadmap for electronic components and systems and for nanotechnology will be elaborated. The presentation is complementary to the one given by James Gavigan in the session on International Cooperation.

Dirk Beernaert

Bharat Bhushan, ASME Science & Technology Policy Fellow, House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology


CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

Bharat Bhushan

Altaf H. (Tof) Carim, Assistant Director for Nanotechnology, Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President, USA


Title: The National Nanotechnology Initiative as a Key Federal Science and Technology Priority: Context and Overview
Contact information: acarim@ostp.eop.gov
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

Abstract:

The National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) is a priority science and technology initiative that spans numerous US Federal agencies, with oversight and involvement from the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) in the Executive Office of the President.  This presentation discusses the context for the NNI in terms of the responsibilities and structure of OSTP and related entities for which it is responsible, including the National Science and Technology Council, under which the NNI is managed.  An overview of the initiative as a whole is also provided, including history, scope, operations, guiding documents, and key topical areas.

Tof Carim

Robert J. Celotta, Director, NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology


Title: Nanotechnology at NIST
Contact information: Robert.Celotta@NIST.gov
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

As the National Metrology Institute for the United States, NIST is charged with not only realizing the International System of Units, but also providing the measurements and standards necessary for science and industry to thrive. It is not surprising, therefore, that the challenge of extending both measurements and standards to the nanoscale has generated an extensive and strong nanotechnology program throughout NIST’s six Laboratories.  In this talk, I will outline and illustrate some of the areas of nanotechnology research underway in NIST’s Laboratories and describe NIST’s Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, a user facility open to all, providing access to current and next generation state-of-the-art nanotechnology tools and processes.

Robert J. Celotta

Hongda Chen, National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA


Title: Nanotechnology for Food and Agriculture at USDA/NIFA
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

Nanotechnology for food and agriculture at USDA/NIFA was initiated in November 2002 when visions and opportunities of nanoscale science, engineering and technology for advancement of agriculture and food systems in the new century were articulated through a national workshop (Scott and Chen, 2003). Nanotechnology in agriculture and food has since quickly grown in many research and educational institutes throughout the country. Nanotechnology R&D supported by USDA/NIFA has aimed at providing innovative solutions to the grand challenges including sustainability, vulnerability, human health, the environment, food safety, education, workforce training, public perception and acceptance. This presentation will offer an overview of nanotechnology to food and agriculture applications, the assessment of perceived risks of engineered nanoparticles in food and agriculture, and the perceptions and acceptance of nanotechnology applications in foods and nanotechnology-based products by the general public and agriculture stakeholders.

Hongda Chen

Ray T. Chen, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the University of Texas, Austin


Title: Silicon Nanomembrane-based Nanophotonic Devices for Communications and Biosensing
Contact information: chen@ece.utexas.edu
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

Silicon nanomembrane based nanophotonic devices provide novel applications not only on silicon but also on a myriad of unconventional substrates such as glass, III-V compounds and PC boards. It will greatly enhance applications in communications and various sensing applications in rigid and conformable surfaces of various military and civilian platforms. In this presentation, we will present intra-chip and inter-chip optical interconnects using silicon subwavelength gratings. Unlike electrical interconnects, optical interconnects provides the possibility of having three dimensional interconnection layers with two dimensional geometry with very low crossing loss (0.02 dB/node experimentally confirmed). 2D optical beam steering with very large steering angle is demonstrated. Further applications using defect engineered photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) based slow light devices provide us with an ultra-sensitive biosensing platform that can be implemented for an open sensing systems suitable for any biomarker detection. Early lung cancer detection result will be presented also with high sensitivity without sacrificing specificity.

Ray Chen

Toyohiro Chikyow, Managing Director of NIMS


Title: INC11 Announcement
Contact information: CHIKYO.toyohiro@nims.go.jp
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

Abstract:

INC11 is scheduled in May, 2015. The Conference place was decided to be Fukuoka city in Kyushu, Japan. Kyushu has been known as the "Si island" and a lot of semiconductor factories were concentrated. Also robotics and car industries are growing and local government is encouraging these new industries. INC11 at Fukuoka will be an exiting Conference with new comers from the local industries with ideas.

Toyohiro Chikyow

Rathindra (Babu) DasGupta, NSF


Title: Translational Programs at NSF for Nanotechnology
Contact information: RDASGUPT@nsf.gov
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

The presentation will focus on the various translational research programs at NSF including the Industry/University Cooperative Research Center, Accelerating Innovation Research, Grant Opportunity for Academic Liaison with Industry,  Engineering Research Center, and the Innovation Corps. Examples of research projects pertaining to nanotechnology in each of these programs will be provided.

Rathindra DasGupta

Gilbert Declerck, Board Member, imec International


Title: Opening Address from Europe
Contact information: gilbert.declerck@imec.be
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

Abstract:

A warm welcome and greetings from Europe with reference to the mission of INC as defined ten years ago.

Gilbert Declerck

Joe Dehmer, Director, Physical Measurement Laboratory, NIST


Title: Welcome
Contact information: joseph.dehmer@nist.gov
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

Abstract:

Founded in 1901, NIST is a non-regulatory federal agency within the U.S. Department of Commerce. NIST's mission is to promote U.S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards, and technology in ways that enhance economic security and improve our quality of life. The NIST Laboratories, carry out its mission by conducting world-class research, often in close collaboration with industry, that advances the nation's technology infrastructure and helps U.S. companies continually improve products and services. The agency operates in two locations: Gaithersburg, Md., (headquarters—234-hectare/578-acre campus) and Boulder, Colo., (84-hectare/208-acre campus). NIST employs about 3,000 scientists, engineers, technicians, and support and administrative personnel. NIST also hosts about 2,700 associates from academia, industry, and other government agencies, who collaborate with NIST staff and access user facilities. In addition, NIST partners more than 1,300 manufacturing specialists and staff at more than 400 MEP service locations around the country.

Joe Dehmer

Makoto Fujimaki, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology


Title: Development of Palmtop Sensor for Rapid Diagnosis
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

Abstract:

We developed a highly sensitive and palmtop sensor based on optical waveguide mode. Biosensing interface on the silica surface of the sensor chip was developed in order to suppress nonspecific adsorption. The first topic is that the discrimination of the H3N2 and H5N1 strains of influenza viruses has been clearly achieved with the waveguide-mode sensor. We found that glycan-based detection using the waveguide sensor system analysis was very useful to distinguish between H3N2 and H5N1 viruses. Sensitivity comparison among the waveguide-mode sensor, immuno-chromatography, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been performed. The highest sensitivity for H1N1 and H3N2 viruses was found in ELISA and the waveguide-mode sensor. The second topic is blood tests with the sensor. A microfluidic system was developed for blood separation. Blood tests for ABO type and Rh statue were performed with the sensor.

Makoto Fujimaki

 


Paolo A. Gargini, Chairman, ITRS


Title: US Industry’s Nanoelectronics Initiatives and Results
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

Abstract:

The National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) was launched in the year 2000 in the United States under Dr. Mike Roco leadership. The NNI paved the way for industry initiatives and by 2005 SIA launched the Nanoelectronics Research Initiative (NRI) aimed at selecting the most likely post-CMOS candidates to be introduced into manufacturing beyond the year 2020. Both NSF and NIST became active members of NRI. SIA had previously launched the Focus Center Research Program (FCRP) in the late 90s, in cooperation with DARPA, aimed at extending CMOS technology to the limit. These two SIA initiatives were jointly reorganized in 2012 since preliminary results of NRI were beginning to bear fruit and were transferred to the FCRP. This latter organization was restructured and renamed Semiconductor Technology Advanced Research Network (STARnet). In addition other organizations like the Center for Energy Efficient Electronics Science (E3S) have augmented the research in post-CMOS devices.

The concurrent success of wireless communication technologies and of mobile computational technologies has bootstrapped and revolutionized both of these industries. Most of all, the insatiable request by the consumers for Customized Functionality has made SoC and SIP, together with heterogeneous integration, the new drivers of the semiconductor industry. Most recently, the ability to store and retrieve any amount of information is posing new challenges on how to manage, use and search though large amounts of data (BIG Data). In addition, the ubiquitous infiltrations of the Internet in all the aspects of everyday life (IOT) is creating a continuous and completely interconnect global society in which system and components requirements have melded into a single entity. INC10 marks the beginning of a renewed international cooperative effort leading into an historical new and exciting era.

Paolo Gargini

Kosmas Galatsis, UCLA


Title: Wrap-up, Societal Implications and Panel Discussion
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

This presentation will crystallize the take home messages of the INC10 whilst also reflecting on survey data from selected delegates on the current and near term nanoelectronic challenges. The presentation will also reflect on past INC conferences and project forward via a vibrant and exciting panel discussions that also includes a non-conventional “BUY SELL or HOLD” discussion format.

Kosmas Galatsis

James P. Gavigan, Head of the Research and Innovation Section, EU Delegation to the U.S.


Title: Horizon 2020: The European Union's Framework Programme for Research and Innovation
Contact information: james.gavigan@eeas.europa.eu
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

Horizon 2020 is the European Union's main instrument for funding research and innovation activities over the next seven years (2014 to 2020). It focuses on three overarching priorities – excellent science, industrial leadership and societal challenges, and was launched in December 2013. Recognizing the increasing importance of internationalisation in how knowledge is produced and used as well as the global nature of the many societal challenges requiring research and innovation solutions, Horizon 2020 is open to participants from anywhere in the world, building on the success of international cooperation in previous framework programs. During the presentation the main elements of Horizon 2020 will be described in terms of content, types of activities funded, forms of participation, the rules which apply, etc. The different types of international cooperation which Horizon 2020 can accommodate – at individual researcher, collaborative project or program level will also be described. Specific reference will be made to opportunities in the nano field.

James P. Gavigan

Charles (Chuck) L. Geraci, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health


Title: Nanotechnology Research at NIOSH Delivering on the Promise through Responsible Development
Contact information: cgeraci@cdc.gov
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

Engineered Nanoscale Materials (ENM) are currently the subject of intense research and application development; all with great potential benefit to society. Delivering on this promise requires safe and responsible development, manufacture, and delivery of these advanced materials and the improved products that use them. Addressing potential Environmental, Health, and Safety hazards posed by ENMs is a critical element early in their life cycle. The scientific literature on the potential hazards from exposure to ENMs is growing but incomplete, and the introduction of ENM-based products is happening at a rapid pace. Because workers are the first to be exposed to any new material, businesses are faced with the challenge of responsible development of this technology in the absence of complete information. In response to this challenge, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) developed a risk-focused research strategy to close a number of knowledge gaps in the major areas of hazard determination, risk assessment, worker exposure measurement, and risk management practices. This presentation will summarize priority areas of research for NIOSH and highlight areas of specific interest to the nanomanufacturing sector.

Charles Geraci

Barbara Goldstein, Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology


Contact information: barbara.goldstein@nist.gov
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

Barbara Goldstein

Lori Henderson, Program Director, NIH


Title: Nanotechnology Investments and Opportunities at the National Institutes of Health
Contact information: hendersonlori@mail.nih.gov
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

Abstract:

The National Institutes of Health (NIH), a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is the primary Federal agency for conducting and supporting medical research.  The NIH’s mission is to seek fundamental knowledge about the nature and behavior of living systems and to apply that knowledge to enhance health, lengthen life, and reduce the burdens of illness and disability.   In support of this mission, the NIH is funding nanoscience and nanotechnology research approaches that have the potential to make valuable contributions in biology and medicine.  It can bring fundamental changes to the study and understanding of biological processes in health and disease, as well as enable novel diagnostics and interventions for treating disease. This presentation will highlight recent basic and clinical research developments in nanotechnology that impact the diagnosis, treatment, or overall management of diseases and patient care.  It will conclude with opportunities in funding R&D.

Lori Henderson

Toshiro Hiramoto, Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo


Title: Report from IPWGN
Contact information: hiramoto@nano.iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

IPWGN (International Planning Working Group for Nanoelectronics) is a task force WG in INC and is organized by three regions (The US, EU, and Japan). The mission of IPWGN is to stimulate and enhance inter-regional cooperation in nanoelectronics through information organization exchange. In this presentation, the activities of IPWGN will be reported. The main activities are: (i) define global research needs of nanoelectronics, (ii) understand the scope and size of regional nanoelectronics research programs, (iii) discuss potential research gaps, and (iv) identify areas where collaboration and cooperation between regions will accelerate programs. The white paper of IPWGN will be distributed in the conference.

Toshiro Hiramoto

Michael Hochberg, Univ. of Delaware


Title:Optoelectronic Systems Integration in Silicon
Contact information: michael.hochberg@gmail.com
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

Abstract:

Over the last ten years, it has become possible to build fairly complex integrated optical systems at telecommunications wavelengths on electronics-compatible silicon substrates.  The OpSIS project is focused on developing and sharing processes suitable for creating large-scale integrated photonic systems-on-chip.  This talk will provide an update on the status of and technical capabilities of these publicly-accessible manufacturing processes, a description of our work on improving photonic design flows, and and an overview of some of the emerging applications being explored in the OpSIS processes.

Michael Hochberg

Debra Kaiser, NIST


Title: NIST’s Nanotechnology Environment, Health, and Safety Research Program
Contact information: debra.kaiser@nist.gov
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

The promise of nanotechnologies and the ensuing economic and societal benefits may never be fully realized due to unknown risks of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs)—nanoscale materials that are purposefully produced—and ENM-enabled products throughout all stages of their life cycles. ENMs pose potential risks to the environment and to the health and safety of workers, consumers, and the public. Science-based assessment and management of such risks requires accurate and reproducible measurements of physico-chemical properties of ENMs such as size and shape, hazard effects such as toxicity, and exposure effects such as release of ENMs from products. NIST is leading the U.S. government effort to establish an infrastructure consisting of tools—reference materials, protocols, data, and transferable instruments—that will enable accurate and reproducible measurements of ENMs. Examples of NIST’s accomplishments for each type of measurement tool will be presented.

Debra Kaiser

Shin'ichiro Kimura, Vice Project Leader, Low-power Electronics Association & Project


Title: Ultra Low-voltage Operation of Devices for Internet of Things (IOT) Applications
Contact information: kimura@leap.or.jp
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

IOT is now considered to be a next thrust for LSIs’ applications. Everything will be connected to the Internet by way of LSIs equipped with a sensor, MPU, memory, and wireless communication device. They are not connected to a power line, meaning that they must survive only by one buttery or energy generated by an energy harvest. Low-power operation of devices, therefore, is requisite and low-voltage operation is the most powerful measure for the low-power operation. Low-power Electronics Association & Project was found in 2010 in order to verify the usefulness of a new device such as a FD-SOI CMOS named SOTB and resistance change non-volatile memories such as MRAM, PCM, and Atom Switch from the viewpoint of the low-voltage operation.

In this presentation, we would like to talk about recent achievements of the LEAP, especially focusing on the performance of several experimental LSIs consisting of LEAP’s new devices.

The project is one of the nano-electronics R&D projects in Tsukuba Innovation Arena (TIA) and is supported by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) and New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO).

Shin'ichiro Kimura

Harriet Kung, Associate Director of Science for Basic Energy Sciences, Department of Energy


Title: Nanoscience for Energy
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

The 21st century brings with it staggering challenges for more advanced energy technologies that are abundant, clean, and economical.  Transforming the ways we generate, supply, transmit, store, and use energy are the paramount opportunities for the world in the coming decades. To convert sunlight to fuel, efficiently store energy, or enable a new generation of energy production and utilization technologies requires the development of new materials and processes of unprecedented functionality and performance.  At the core of these challenges are the opportunities to advance the nano science and technology, as the elementary steps involved in energy collection, utilization, and conversion take place on the nanoscale.  This talk will provide an overview of the Basic Energy Sciences program with an emphasis on the support of nanoscale sciences with an aim at laying the foundation for major energy technology breakthroughs.

Harriet Kung

Hubert Lakner, Chair, Fraunhofer Mikroelektronik &  Director, Fraunhofer IPMS


CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

Hubert Lakner

Mitch Lasat, EPA


Title: Nanotechnology Research Supported through EPA’s Science to Achieve Results (STAR), competitive grants program
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

Nanotechnology is rapidly becoming a major enabling industry. Since 2001, the Environmental Protection Agency has invested substantially to realize the potential for environmental applications of nanotechnology. Significant advances have been reported in the application of nanotechnology and the use of nanomaterials for environmental remediation, detection and sensing, and understanding the life cycle of nanomaterials. More recently, a high-priority research area identified by the EPA Office of Research and Development is to better understand the environmental impact and risk posed by manufactured nanomaterials. Specifically, we are interested in (1) evaluation of potential exposures to engineered nanomaterials including an exploration of environmental and biological fate, transport, and transformation of these materials throughout their lifetimes and (2) understanding the implications of nanotechnology and manufactured nanomaterials on human health including their toxicology and effects. Through the Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants program, EPA has worked collaborative with several federal and international funding partners to address the strategic research needs identified by the National Nanotechnology Initiative. This talk will provide an overview of the STAR competitive grants program in nanotechnology research.  It will conclude with an investigation into future research needs and opportunities for funding.

 

Subhas Malghan, Deputy Director in the Center for Devices and Radiological Health, FDA


Title: Regulatory Science Relevant to Products Containing Nanotechnology
Contact information: Subhas.Malghan@fda.hhs.gov
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH), U.S. Food and Drug Administration, has the responsibility for regulatory review of medical devices and radiological products, including in-vitro diagnostic products. CDRH scientists continue to examine the broad field of nanotechnology relevant to the medical device landscape and have developed a few measures to address science as well as regulatory needs of the Center. These include building knowledge base, experimental expertise, collaborative research as well as standards coordination.

The goal of FDA’s regulatory science research is to address key scientific gaps in knowledge, methods, or tools needed to make regulatory assessments of these products. This talk will focus on introduction to FDA as a science based agency, challenges/issues related to regulatory science, and scientific gaps in nanotechnology regulatory science.

Subhas Malghan

Michael A. Meador, Manager, Nanotechnology Project, National Aeronautics and Space Administration


Title: Future Needs and Opportunities in Nanotechnology for Aerospace Applications – NASA Overview
Contact information: Michael.A.Meador@nasa.gov
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

Weight, performance and durability are critical drivers for any aerospace system.  Reduced vehicle and system weight can enable reduced fuel consumption and emissions (aircraft), reduced launch costs and complexity (spacecraft) and increased payload capacity.  Performance improvements can enhance vehicle and mission capability.  System and vehicle durability are important since they impact mission safety and effectiveness.  Nanotechnology has the potential to help address each of these concerns by enabling such developments as lightweight, multifunctional materials, low power and volume sensors with high selectivity and sensitivity, radiation hard, fault tolerant electronics, and higher output energy generation and storage devices.  NASA has developed a 20+ year plan for the development of nanostructured materials and devices and their insertion in NASA missions.  This presentation will provide a perspective on future needs identified in the roadmap and a few examples of current research activities focused on meeting those needs.

Michael A. Meador

David Miller, Stanford University


Title: Low-Energy Optoelectronics for Interconnects
Contact information: dabm@ee.stanford.edu
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

Power consumption and bandwidth density in the interconnections inside machines are increasingly constraining the capability of information processing and communications. Optics is arguably the only physical approach that has the capability to address both the energy and the density of interconnections to allow the continued scaling of information processing. These needs have driven new optoelectronic device approaches in which high integration density and low energy consumption are critical. As a result, research has started to focus on minimizing energy consumption in integrable optoelectronic devices. Operating energies in the scale of ~ 10 fJ are being demonstrated, and the first sub-fJ devices are emerging, some with serious prospects of integration in silicon integrated circuit processes. Optics is also offering new modalities, such as mode-division multiplexing, for yet higher densities. New approaches and concepts using nanoscale optics and optoelectronics offer prospects for future very high density and low energy communications integrated inside information processing and switching. The talk will discuss recent advances and future prospects.

David Meador

Mitsuyoshi Mori, Chief Engineer, Panasonic


Title: Thin Organic Photoconductive Film Image Sensors with Extremely High Saturation of 8500 electrons/mm2
Contact information: mori.mitsuyoshi@jp.panasonic.com
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

Abstract:

We have developed image sensors with thin organic photoconductive films (OPF) laminated on top of CMOS circuits. The OPF has a high optical absorption, about 10 times higher than Si, in wavelength range of visible light and a low dark current of 50 pA/cm2, which is comparable to those of conventional image sensors with buried photodiode structures. Photo-charges generated in the OPF are directly transferred to a PN junction, which can accumulate the charges as high as 8500 electrons/mm2. In addition, the read-out noise is reduced to 2.9 electrons by newly developed noise reduction circuit. The OPF image sensors can be used in variety of applications such as digital still cameras, single-lens reflex cameras and mobile phones.

Mitsuyoshi Mori

Takao Mori, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), MANA, Tsukuba, Japan


Title: Utilizing Nanotechnology for Advanced Thermoelectric and Thermal Management Technology Development
Contact information: MORI.Takao@nims.go.jp
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

Two-thirds of all primary energy (oil, gas, etc.) is sadly unutilized, with much of the waste being heat. The direct conversion of waste-heat to electricity is a large incentive to find viable thermoelectric (TE) materials, as is developing advanced thermal management. One key to both is through utilizing state-of-the-art nanotechnology and nanomaterials [1]. I present recent results where selective scattering of phonons and enhancement of TE properties through nanostructuring; both a) mechanical and b) bottom-up methods were achieved, together with new concepts such as utilizing magnetic semiconductors and hybrid effects in nanocomposites. Developments for high temperature TE materials for thermal power plants (topping cycles), steelworks, incinerators, solar power have also been made. Advanced nanoscale thermal analysis and measurement technologies have also been developed at the NIMS Open Innovation Center, Thermal Lab; a new platform for multiple companies and institutes.

[1]Thermoelectric Nanomaterials, eds. K. Koumoto and T. Mori, (Springer, Heidelberg, 2013).

Takao Mori

Naofumi Moriya, Director for Nanotechnology and Materials, Bureau of Science, Technology and Innovation Policy, Cabinet Office


Title: Regional Update on Science & Technology Policy in Japan
Contact information: naofumi.moriya@cao.go.jp
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

From Fiscal Year of 2014, new national innitiatives will be introduced related to science and technology policy. "Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program" and "Impulsing Paradigm Change through Disruptive Technologies (ImPACT) Program" are now being put into practice. The presentation will show the outline of these innitiatives focusing the objectives and the expectations of those programs.

Naofumi Moriya

Anil K. Patri, Deputy Director, Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research


Title: Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory: The Model and Lessons Learned
Contact information: anil.patri@nih.gov
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

Promising drug discoveries in basic research are often not translatable to clinic for a variety of reasons.  This “valley of death” at successive stages of development can be a significant stumbling block for urgently needed cancer therapies. This presentation provides an overview of a successful model developed by the National Cancer Institute to advance promising nanotechnology concepts from proof-of-principle into clinic by providing pre-clinical characterization resources through the Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory (NCL).  Since it’s inception in 2004, the NCL has completed over 85 projects through physico-chemical assessment, in vitro and in vivo studies, resulting in seven collaborators entering clinical trials with their lead candidates.  The many pitfalls and lessons learned through rigorous investigations to confirm reproducibility, safety and efficacy through robust assays, will be presented.

Anil K. Patri

Peter Peumans, imec


Title: Moving the Needle in the Life Sciences Using Semiconductor Technology
Contact information: Peter.Peumans@imec.be
CV/Bio:

Abstract:

Semiconductor nanotechnology is a very powerful to implement sensing and computation. At the same time, the paradigm offers manufacturability at extremely low cost. By tuning chip design and materials parameters, and by integrating additional components into a fab-compatible flow, compelling life science applications can be realized on-chip. In this talk, we will discuss some of the basic building blocks and example customized life science chips that offer breakthrough performance.

Peter Peumans

Curt Richter, Leader of Nanoelectronics Group, NIST


Contact information: curt.richter@nist.gov
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

Curt Richter

Mihail C. Roco, Senior Advisor, National Science Foundation

Contact information: mroco@nsf.gov
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

Title: NSF and Long-view for Nanotechnology Development

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Abstract:

In a relatively short interval for an emerging technology, nanotechnology has made a significant economic impact in numerous sectors including semiconductor manufacturing, catalysts, medicine, agriculture, and energy production reaching $1 trillion market of nano-enabled products in 2013. A long-term vision for nanotechnology development was formulated in 1999-2000 that promised to create basic understanding and a general purpose technology with mass economic and sustainable use by 2020 (“Nanotechnology Research Directions: Vision for Nanotechnology in the next Decade” Springer 2000, www.wtec.org/loyola/nano/IWGN.Research.Directions/). The realization of the first decade of the vision and an outlook for the future is supported by the international evaluation study performed after ten years (“Nanotechnology Research Directions for Societal Needs in 2020” Springer 2011, www.wtec.org/nano2/).

The National Science Foundation (NSF) had its first competition on nanoparticle research in 1991, and since October 2000 contributes to the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI). NSF currently supports over 5,000 active awards and 10,000 students annually on fundamental research, balanced infrastructure and education across all disciplines of science and engineering with an actual budget of about $450 million in the last three years. The presentation will discuss priorities, recent results, and a longitudinal analysis of the effects of NSF funded basic research on USPTO patents and WoS publications.

Title: National Nanotechnology Initiative in the International Context

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Abstract:

A thirty year outlook for nanotechnology development was formulated about 2000, with the promise to create basic understanding and a general purpose technology with mass and sustainable use by 2020 (“Nanotechnology Research Directions” Springer 2000; “Nanotechnology Research Directions for Societal Needs in 2020” Springer 2011, www.wtec.org/nano2/) and socio-economic divergence by 2030.  National Nanotechnology initiative (NNI) goals and outcomes are presented in comparison to other regions and global results, including the number of publications, patents, their citations, investments and markets.   NNI priorities are funded under several ‘Signature initiatives” since 2011:  (a) Nanoelectronics for 2020 and Beyond; (b) Sustainable Nanomanufacturing; (c) Nanotechnology for Solar Energy; (d) Nanotechnology Knowledge Infrastructure, and (e) Nanosensors.  A current focus is on the third generation of nanotechnology products including nanosystems, self-powered nanodevices, and nano-bio assemblies.  There is an increased focus on nanoscale science and engineering integration with other knowledge and technology domains and their applications (“Converging Knowledge, Technology and Society: Beyond Nano-Bio-Info-Cognitive Technologies”, Springer 2013, www.wtec.org/NBIC2-Report/).  The global nanotechnology labor and markets are estimated to double each three years, reaching about $4 trillion market encompassing 8 million jobs by 2020. 

Mihail C. Roco

Ruud E.I. Schropp, ECN - Solliance

Title: Novel Light Management for Ultrathin Solar Cells
Contact information: Schropp@ecn.nl
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

For future production of sustainable electricity at prices compatible with bulk electricity production, the development of highly efficient solar cells is required, preferably using earth-abundant and non-toxic materials only. To achieve this, cells with ultrathin active semiconductor layers are under investigation, for use both in single-junction thin film solar cells and in wide band gap component cell(s) of tandem and multijunction cells. Recently, new insight has been obtained on scattering front and back electrodes of single junction cells that may help improve tandem cells as well. Both plasmonic and dielectric scatterers have been applied to trap the incident light in the solar device. The scattering patterns can be 1D or 2D, leading to diffraction and/or photonic modes in the absorber layer. Also pseudo-random 2D scatterers have been proposed, to produce a more broadband coupling of the light to this layer. Finally, elongated nanostructures have been introduced to enhance scattering as well as to provide local vertical junctions that reduce the carrier collection length.

These nano-3D scaffolds for thin-film absorbers should preferably be achieved with techniques that are scalable. One such method is lithography-free solution growth processing which provides a random nanorod-type morphology. Another promising technique for large area processing is nanoimprint lithography. The advantage is that a designed morphology can be imposed on a template for the cells and the technique can be extended to industrial roll to sheet and roll to roll methods. We will show examples of experimental cells with integrated light management structure fabricated by these scalable techniques.

Ruud E.I. Schropp

David Seiler, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Title:Overview of INC10 and US Nano Day
Contact information:
david.seiler@nist.gov
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

Download Presentation Slides: Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday

Abstract:

On behalf of the Executive and Program Committee members throughout the world - Welcome to the Tenth International Nanotechnology Conference on Communication and Cooperation (INC 10) which is hosted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Gaithersburg, Maryland, from May 13-16, 2014.

For the tenth year in a row, global senior researchers, industry leaders and policy makers from around the world will gather for in-depth discussions and technical sessions on a variety of important issues related to the future of international collaboration in nanotechnologies.

The INC vision is to foster international communication and cooperation on nanotechnology and particularly on nanoelectronics between industry, academic and government partners to advance innovation in computer, communications, electronics, and related industries. Global science and technology trends and overviews of major regional funding programs will be presented from Europe, Japan and the United States that address scientific and societal challenges, and that support sustainable technological and economic growth.

Technical sessions will highlight some of today's state of affairs and tomorrow's challenges and bottlenecks regarding various related domains in nanoelectronics and explore the links with related areas, such as biotechnology, advanced materials development, microsystems and photonics.

Dave Seiler

Lewis Sloter, Associate Director, Materials & Structures, U.S. Department of Defense


Title: Overview of Nanotechnology within the Department of Defense
Contact information: lewis.e.sloter.civ@mail.mil
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

The status and ongoing role of nanotechnology research and evolving applications are presented in the context of the department’s national security mission. Highlights associated with the Military Departments and Defense Agencies performing relevant projects are provided with a special emphasis on the breadth of opportunities and potential enhanced or new defense capabilities provided by nanotechnology advances generally and engineered nanomaterials especially. The role of the DoD as a founding participant in the National Nanotechnology Initiative and the value of federal coordination and collaboration as well as broader forms of collaboration, including international, are discussed along with areas of increasing emphasis, such as nanomanufacturing and the incorporation of nanomaterials in complex materials systems for functional advantage. The importance of a wide spectrum of performers, including academia, small businesses, large businesses, and consortia is noted in conjunction with selected examples.

Sloter

Junichi Sone, Executive Vice President, National Institute for Materials Science


Title: Opening Addresses
Contact information: SONE.Junichi@nims.go.jp
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

Abstract:

TBD

Junichi Sone

Adam Stieg, California NanoSystems Institute, UCLA


Title:Neuromorphic Atomic Switch Networks
Contact information: stieg@cnsi.ucla.edu

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Abstract:

Efforts to emulate the formidable information processing capabilities of the brain through neuromorphic engineering have been bolstered by recent progress in the fabrication of nonlinear, nanoscale circuit elements that exhibit synapse-like operational characteristics. However, conventional fabrication techniques are unable to efficiently generate structures with the highly complex interconnectivity found in biological neuronal networks. Here we demonstrate the physical realization of a self-assembled neuromorphic device which implements basic concepts of systems neuroscience through a hardware-based platform comprised of over a billion interconnected atomic-switch inorganic synapses embedded in a complex network of silver nanowires. Observations of network activation and passive harmonic generation demonstrate a collective response to input stimulus in agreement with recent theoretical predictions. Further, emergent behaviors unique to the complex network of atomic switches and akin to brain function are observed, namely spatially distributed memory, recurrent dynamics and the activation of feedforward subnetworks. These devices display the functional characteristics required for implementing unconventional, biologically and neurally inspired computational methodologies in a synthetic experimental system.

Adam Stieg

Thomas N. Theis, Executive Director, SRC Nanoelectronics Research Initiative


Title: Emerging Research Themes in Nanoelectronics
Contact information: ttheis@us.ibm.com
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

The Field Effect Transistor (FET), sparked the information technology revolution. Now, after decades of devoting resources to improving the FET, leading U.S. semiconductor companies are increasing their research investment in new devices and circuit architectures with the potential to take information technology beyond the inherent limits of the FET.  Through the Nanoelectronics Research Inititive (NRI)  and now STARnet, industry has partnered with NIST, NSF, and DARPA to promote university research on this new frontier. Some of the devices explored to date, such as tunneling FETs (TFETs) based on III-V semiconductors, promise to open a new low-power design space which is inaccessible to conventional FETs. Nanomagnetic devices may allow memory and logic functions to be combined in novel ways. And newer, more promising device concepts continue to emerge. Despite the growing research investment, the landscape of promising research opportunities outside the “FET box” appears to be vast and still largely unexplored.

Thomas N. Theis

Mark Tuominen, Director, National Nanomanufacturing Network, Professor, University of Massachusetts Amherst


Title: The National Nanomanufacturing Network: Building Nanomanufacturing Efficiencies
Contact information: tuominen@physics.umass.edu
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

The last decade has seen great advancements in the development of scalable methods for manufacturing nanoscale materials and devices. This has created great opportunities in many application sectors. Implementing new processes in the manufacturing workflow meets certain hurdles that can be overcome more easily through robust intellectual and physical infrastructure. This presentation will highlight existing and potential efficiencies for nanomanufacturing as identified through recent activities of the National Nanomanufacturing Network (NNN). The NNN is an alliance of academic, government and industry partners that cooperate to advance nanomanufacturing in the United States. The NNN activities serve as a catalyst for progress in nanomanufacturing in the U.S., through the facilitation and promotion of strategic nanomanufacturing workshops, roadmapping, standards development, fostering of collaborations, promotion of test beds, and nanoinformatics. The NNN is funded by the National Science Foundation through grant CMMI-1025020 Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing.

Mark Tuominen

Gernot S. Pomrenke, Program Manager for Optoelectronics, Photonics and Nanotechnology, Air Force Office of Scientific Research


CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

Gernot Pomrenke

Sergio O. Valenzuela, Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia


Title: Topological Insulators. Fundamentals and Perspectives
Contact information: SOV@icrea.cat
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

Topological Insulators (TI) are materials which behave as insulators in their bulk, but that have protected conducting states at their boundaries. Notably, TIs can be predicted within the simple framework of the band theory of solids and more than fifty compounds have already been proposed. They arise due to the combination of spin-orbit interaction and time reversal
symmetry and were first theoretically predicted and then experimentally discovered in twodimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) systems. In the 3D case, the surface state can be characterized by 2D spin-polarized massless Dirac fermions, whereas the 2D case is a quantum spin Hall state with edge states that are reminiscent of the integer quantum Hall insulator. In this talk, I will review the fundamentals of topological insulators and their exotic properties. I will describe recent experiments and the fundamental signatures that have already been observed. Prospects for potential device applications will also be discussed.

Sergio O. Valenzuela

Fred van Roosmalen, VP External Relations NXP Semiconductors


Title: Regional update: Europe – Industry
Contact information: fred.van.roosmalen@nxp.com
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

The European industries and institutes in the nanoelectronics domain recognize that applications become more and more important. ‘Smart Everything Everywhere’ is the next big wave, and it comes with big opportunities and big challenges for everybody. None of these can be captured or resolved by stand-alone technologies, all require a full system approach. This year, industries and institutes are embarking in the new R&D&I program ECSEL, together with the European Commission and with participating countries. The ECSEL program is the Horizon 2020 successor of the previous ENIAC and ARTEMIS initiatives. It focuses on ‘Smart Everything Everywhere’ applications with significant societal and economic impact, connecting nanoelectronics with cyber-physical systems and integration across the value chain. Throughout the ECSEL strategic agenda, emerging technologies firmly link with future nanoelectronics applications.

Fred van Roosmalen


Maud Vinet, Leti Advanced CMOS manager


Title: FDSOI a New Paradigm from Substrates to Products
Contact information: maud.vinet@cea.fr
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

Abstract:

Over the past decades, transistors have been continuously scaled down in size in order to increase performance and reduce power consumption, leading to better digital devices and an enhanced user experience.

As the transistor has shrunk to a size now below a few tens of nanometers one of the main challenges is to control undesirable leakage current which represents a significant proportion of the power consumption of the transistor.

In this frame Fully depleted SOI (FDSOI) is considered as an option to continue MOSFET scaling for 28nm technology node and beyond.

This paper will first remind the FDSOI device physics. Excellent short-channel control without need to channel doping and, as a result, immunity to random dopant fluctuations, negligible GIDL and junction leakage, and possibility of VT tuning and power management using a back-gate bias, make FDSOI devices especially attractive.

Then we will demonstrate the technology readiness over three generations. Energy efficiency with FDSOI based circuits have been demonstrated in 28FDSOI. 14FDSOI is reaching a development maturity and technological path to 10FDSOI is known. We will also show how the collaborative R&D effort through Europe was a key asset to leverage the FDSOI technology.

Maud Vinet

M. Juergen Wolf, Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration


Title: Heterogeneous Integration as a Holistic Approach
Contact information: wolf@izm.fraunhofer.de
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

3D integration is of high significance for the realization of future innovative products. With its outstanding competencies in the fields of technology, design and reliability, Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft offers an excellent base for the market-oriented implementation of 3D integration for the industry in Germany, Europe and worldwide. The Fraunhofer institutes IZM, ENAS, IIS-EAS, IKTS, IPMS cluster their competencies in a network to cover a broad spectrum of topics related to 3D integration and to be able to offer a holistic approach. The presentation will show the complex correlation of the different aspects of 3D integration and shows the status quo the activities and capabilities of the Fraunhofer cluster partner and points out the clusters given prerequisites to act as a competent project, technology and service partner.

M. Juergen Wolf


Jun Ye, Fellow, JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Colorado


Title: Making the World’s Best Atomic Clock
Contact information: Ye@JILA.colorado.edu
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

The relentless pursuit of spectroscopy resolution has been a key drive for many scientific and technological breakthroughs over the past century, including the invention of laser and the creation of ultracold matter.  With the help of nanotechnology, state-of-the-art lasers now maintain optical phase coherence over many seconds and provide this piercing resolution across the entire visible spectrum. The new capability in control of light has enabled us to create and probe novel quantum matters via manipulation of dilute atomic and molecular gases at ultralow temperatures. For the first time, we control the quantum states of more than 1000 atoms so precisely that we achieve a more accurate and more precise atomic clock than any existing atomic clocks. With the clock accuracy and stability both reaching the 10-18 level, we now realize a single atomic clock with the best performance in both key ingredients necessary for a primary standard. We are also on the verge of integrating novel many-body quantum states into the frontiers of precision metrology, aiming to advance measurement beyond the standard quantum limit. Such advanced clocks will also allow us to test the fundamental laws of nature and find applications among a wide range of technological frontiers.

Jun Ye

Charles Ying, Program Director, Electronic and Photonic Materials Division of Materials Research, National Science Foundation


Title: 2D Materials Beyond Graphene
Contact information: cying@nsf.gov
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

This talk describes ongoing and future investment on two-dimensional materials and devices beyond graphene at the National Science Foundation (NSF). Various funding mechanisms are used to support single investigators, small teams, and centers. The talk will highlight some examples of current research on this topic supported by NSF. It will also describe ongoing competition of interdisciplinary team research project through Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI), where NSF and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) work together support research on two-dimensional materials and devices, with novel electrical, optical, thermal, mechanical, chemical and biological properties and their applications.

Charles Ying

Naoki Yokoyama, Fellow, Fujitsu Laboratories


Title: Bridge Building Between Nanoelectronics and Semiconductor Industries
Contact information: yokoyama.naoki@nifty.com
CV/Bio: Click here to find the CV/Bio.

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Abstract:

Four research projects were initiated in 2010 in the core research domain of nanoelectronics in Tsukuba Innovation Arena (TIA-nano). Three of them are FIRST programs, namely the “Development of core technologies for green nanoelectronics” led by the author (Yokoyama) of this presentation, the “Research and development of ultralow-power spintronics-based logic VLSIs” led by Prof. Ohno of Tohoku University, and the “Technology development for photonic-electronic convergence system” led by Prof. Arakawa of the University of Tokyo. The fourth project is the “Ultra low voltage device project for low-carbon society”, which is sponsored by METI/NEDO. These four projects were launched, and more than one hundred researchers from industry, academia, and AIST have gathered under one roof, and using the same 4500 m2 super-clean space facilities at TIA-nano. A common target of these projects is to lower the power consumption of ICT, and thus creating green innovation.


After describing the representative R&D results of these projects, this paper discusses the serious difficulty in bridge-building between these nanoelectronics and semiconductor industries in Japan, while also discussing the current status and future direction of the major semiconductor industries.
A new JST CREST/PREST project called “Innovative nano-electronics through interdisciplinary collaboration among material, device and system layers” supervised by Prof. Sakurai and the author (Yokoyama) has been initiated to deal with this difficulty. The CREST project requires an applicant to construct a team of highly cooperative researchers from multiple R&D layers, typically, material, device, circuits/assembly, and system/architecture. The newly proposed scheme by the Semiconductor Industry Research Institute Japan (SIRIJ) to build a bridge between nanoelectronics and industries will be also discussed.

Naoki Yokoyama

 

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